Student t distribution

One of my favorite anecdotes that I share with my statistics students is why the Student t distribution is called the t distribution and not the Gosset distribution.

From Wikipedia:

In the English-language literature it takes its name from William Sealy Gosset’s 1908 paper in Biometrika under the pseudonym “Student”. Gosset worked at the Guinness Brewery in Dublin, Ireland, and was interested in the problems of small samples, for example the chemical properties of barley where sample sizes might be as low as 3. One version of the origin of the pseudonym is that Gosset’s employer preferred staff to use pen names when publishing scientific papers instead of their real name, therefore he used the name “Student” to hide his identity. Another version is that Guinness did not want their competitors to know that they were using the t-test to test the quality of raw material.

Gosset’s paper refers to the distribution as the “frequency distribution of standard deviations of samples drawn from a normal population”. It became well-known through the work of Ronald A. Fisher, who called the distribution “Student’s distribution” and referred to the value as t.

From the 1963 book Experimentation and Measurement (see pages 68-69 of the PDF, which are marked as pages 69-70 on the original):

The mathematical solution to this problem was first discovered by an Irish chemist who wrote under the pen name of “Student.” Student worked for a company that was unwilling to reveal its connection with him lest its competitors discover that Student’s work would also be advantageous to them. It now seems extraordinary that the author of this classic paper on measurements was not known for more than twenty years. Eventually it was learned that his real name was William Sealy Gosset (1876-1937).
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