io9: “I Fooled Millions Into Thinking Chocolate Helps Weight Loss. Here’s How.”

Peer-reviewed publications is the best way that we’ve figured out for vetting scientific experiments and disseminating scientific knowledge. But that doesn’t mean that the system can’t be abused, either consciously or unconsciously.

The eye-opening article http://io9.com/i-fooled-millions-into-thinking-chocolate-helps-weight-1707251800 describes how the author published flimsy data that any discerning statistician should have seen through and even managed to get his “results” spread in the popular press. Some money quotes:

Here’s a dirty little science secret: If you measure a large number of things about a small number of people, you are almost guaranteed to get a “statistically significant” result. Our study included 18 different measurements—weight, cholesterol, sodium, blood protein levels, sleep quality, well-being, etc.—from 15 people. (One subject was dropped.) That study design is a recipe for false positives.

Think of the measurements as lottery tickets. Each one has a small chance of paying off in the form of a “significant” result that we can spin a story around and sell to the media. The more tickets you buy, the more likely you are to win. We didn’t know exactly what would pan out—the headline could have been that chocolate improves sleep or lowers blood pressure—but we knew our chances of getting at least one “statistically significant” result were pretty good.

And:

With the paper out, it was time to make some noise. I called a friend of a friend who works in scientific PR. She walked me through some of the dirty tricks for grabbing headlines. It was eerie to hear the other side of something I experience every day.

The key is to exploit journalists’ incredible laziness. If you lay out the information just right, you can shape the story that emerges in the media almost like you were writing those stories yourself. In fact, that’s literally what you’re doing, since many reporters just copied and pasted our text.

And:

The only problem with the diet science beat is that it’s science. You have to know how to read a scientific paper—and actually bother to do it. For far too long, the people who cover this beat have treated it like gossip, echoing whatever they find in press releases. Hopefully our little experiment will make reporters and readers alike more skeptical.

If a study doesn’t even list how many people took part in it, or makes a bold diet claim that’s “statistically significant” but doesn’t say how big the effect size is, you should wonder why. But for the most part, we don’t. Which is a pity, because journalists are becoming the de facto peer review system. And when we fail, the world is awash in junk science.

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1 Comment

  1. Barbara Meyer

     /  September 7, 2015

    People are easily fooled and others take advantage of their gullibility or their laziness. My middle school students have been challenging information found in their history books and it’s amazing how much is actually incorrect in relatively new textbooks. My mantra to them is how do you know this really happened.

    Reply

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