Engaging students: Finding the area of a square or rectangle

In my capstone class for future secondary math teachers, I ask my students to come up with ideas for engaging their students with different topics in the secondary mathematics curriculum. In other words, the point of the assignment was not to devise a full-blown lesson plan on this topic. Instead, I asked my students to think about three different ways of getting their students interested in the topic in the first place.

I plan to share some of the best of these ideas on this blog (after asking my students’ permission, of course).

This student submission comes from my former student Austin Stone. His topic, from Geometry: finding the area of a square or rectangle.

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How could you as a teacher create an activity or project that involves your topic?

There are many applications to the real world that involves geometry and specifically area of squares and rectangles. Students could use this topic to find the cheapest cost of tiling the floor of a bathroom. Giving them the dimensions of the different tiles and the cost of each tile, students would have to find the area of the bathroom floor and then be able to pick the set of tiles that would be the most efficient and cheapest. This gives students a real world application to what they are learning while also giving them practice in finding the area given dimensions of a square and/or rectangle. This project also calls back to prior knowledge such as perimeter of rectangles and multiplying cost of one tile with the number of tiles used to get to total price. This project could also be a small part of a bigger PBL using area and perimeter of multiple polygons.

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How does this topic extend what your students should have learned in previous courses?

The obvious prior knowledge to finding the area of a square of rectangle is being able multiply two numbers which is learned back in grade school. If the students are given the area of the square or rectangle and labeling the sides with a variable, the students would have to be able to solve for the variable. By doing this they would have to be able to multiply binomials (or polynomials if you want students to have more of a challenge). Once they multiply the two binomials and set the equation equal to the area given, they would then have to use the quadratic formula or factor which is learned in Algebra I. If students are given one side and the area, then they would have to solve for a variable with degree one which is used continually in all math classes. Depending on what information is given in the area problem, students will have to use prior knowledge to determine the answer.

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How have different cultures throughout time used this topic in their society?

In East Asian mathematics during the 1st-7th centuries, a book called The Nine Chapters gives formulas for solid figures including squares and rectangles. The formulas are given as series of operations to get the result, called algorithms. Instead of variable and symbols, the formulas are given in sentences as in, “multiply the length of the rectangle by the width.” This puts the regular A=lw into words so that if someone who had no idea how to compute the area, they would be able to understand by the sentence given. This undoubtably was much more difficult to follow and became too long of descriptions for more complex figures, as this way of mathematics ended in Eastern Asian in the 7th century. That does not mean that this way of math was not important. This put words into formulas instead of symbols which made it easier to understand for those that are learning it for the first time.

References

https://www.britannica.com/science/East-Asian-mathematics/The-great-early-period-1st-7th-centuries

Engaging students: Finding the area of a square or rectangle

In my capstone class for future secondary math teachers, I ask my students to come up with ideas for engaging their students with different topics in the secondary mathematics curriculum. In other words, the point of the assignment was not to devise a full-blown lesson plan on this topic. Instead, I asked my students to think about three different ways of getting their students interested in the topic in the first place.

I plan to share some of the best of these ideas on this blog (after asking my students’ permission, of course).

This student submission comes from my former student Christian Oropeza. His topic, from Geometry: finding the area of a square or rectangle.

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How can this topic be used in your students’ future courses in mathematics or science?

Finding the area of a square or rectangle comes up again later in Geometry when solving for the surface area of a prism. The reason behind this is because any n-sided prism, where n is the number of sides the base of the prism has, will have n many squares or rectangles. Therefore, in order to calculate the surface area of any prism, the use of finding the area of a square or rectangle is required (Reference 1). Another course that involves this topic is Calculus. When approximating the area under a curve, one strategy is to use left or right endpoint approximation which is just the sum of the areas of the rectangles under or over the curve (Reference 2). This topic is also used in physics when covering measurements. The idea of finding the area of a square or rectangle in the measurements section is to precisely and accurately find the area.

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How has this topic appeared in the news?

Steiner Ranch is a hair studio that just recently added 1600 square feet, thus bringing their total to 3468 square feet. With the addition of more space the studio now holds: 19 stylist chairs, 8 shampoo bowls, 3 restrooms, and a color mixing room. All in all, this could not have been done without the use of finding the area of a square or rectangle because then the owner, Brian Charles, would not know how much of each studio equipment would be able to fit in a way that was fitting for him (Reference 3). In other news, state deputies of the Legislative Assembly of Rondonia decided to try creating 11 new protected area in the Brazilian Amazon, which amounted to a total of 2,316 square miles. Therefore, the use of the area of a square was used to determine how much area would go to the new protected areas. However, the bacanda ruralista agribusiness lobby opposed this decision and passed a bill that did not allow the process of making the protected areas (Reference 4).

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How have different cultures throughout time used this topic in their society?

During 570-495 BC, the use of finding the area of a square impacted math in Greek culture. More specifically, a man by the name of Pythagoras created what is known now to be the Pythagorean Theorem. He discovered this theorem by noticing that the area of the square created by the hypotenuse of a right triangle is equal to the sum of the area of the squares created by the other two sides of the same right triangle (Reference 5). Also, there were different cultures who had discovered the same formula as the Pythagorean Theorem, but were not the first to publish their findings. These different cultures include: Mesopotamian, Indian, and Chinese (Reference 6). Finding the area of a square or a rectangle comes up immensely in computing the cost for installation of hardwood floors. The cost is computed by charging the customer for the price of each square foot of wood used and the labor for each square foot of wood installed (Reference 7).

References:

  1. https://www.varsitytutors.com/hotmath/hotmath_help/topics/surface-area-of-a-prism
  2. https://www3.nd.edu/~apilking/Math10560/Calc1Lectures/24.%20Areas%20and%20Distances.pdf
  3. https://communityimpact.com/austin/lake-travis-westlake/business/2018/10/09/steiner-ranch-area-hair-studio-tacks-on-an-additional-1600-square-feet/
  4. https://news.mongabay.com/2018/10/brazil-scraps-11-new-amazon-protected-areas-covering-2316-square-miles/
  5. https://study.com/academy/lesson/development-of-geometry-in-different-cultures.html#lesson
  6. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pythagorean_theorem
  7. https://www.homeadvisor.com/cost/flooring/install-wood-flooring/

 

Engaging students: Finding the area of a square or rectangle

In my capstone class for future secondary math teachers, I ask my students to come up with ideas for engaging their students with different topics in the secondary mathematics curriculum. In other words, the point of the assignment was not to devise a full-blown lesson plan on this topic. Instead, I asked my students to think about three different ways of getting their students interested in the topic in the first place.

I plan to share some of the best of these ideas on this blog (after asking my students’ permission, of course).

This student submission comes from my former student Trent Pope. His topic, from Geometry: finding the area of a square or rectangle.

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How could you as a teacher create an activity or project that involves your topic?

On this website I saw that the Kelso High School GIC students went out and built a home as a class project. They were able to get a $13,000 grant from Lowe’s Home Improvement and blueprints from Fleetwood Homes to go out and build a physical house. I like the idea of having students use geometry in a real world application, as a teacher I would bring this idea to paper. Students would design and create blueprints for their dream house using squares and rectangles. I would start by giving them the total area their house will be. For example, I would tell them to make the blueprints for a 400 square foot house. They could have anywhere from 5 rooms to 20 rooms in their house. They will be responsible for showing the measurements for each room. After creating the layout of the house and calculating the areas of each room, students will be given a set amount of money to spend on flooring. They will then calculate the cost to put either carpet, wood, or tile in each room. This is to have students decide if they would have enough money to have a large room and if so what flooring would be best. There are other aspects you can add to this project to make it more personalized, but as teachers we just want to make sure we are having students find the area of square and rectangles.

http://tdn.com/news/local/geometry-in-construction-class-finishes-building-first-home/article_74143492-d7a9-11e2-995a-001a4bcf887a.html

 

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How has this topic appeared in the news?

There are many instances of where area made the news. I found multiple websites that talk about how schools are having building projects for geometry and construction classes. These students are building homes from 128 square feet to 400 square feet. Teachers are having students make these homes so that they can see that geometry is in the real world. By having a range of sizes, students have to adjust their calculations. When creating a house or mobile home you need to accommodate for walking space in each room. In order for students to know if there is enough space, they must find the area of each room. Teachers are using this project because blueprints for houses only use squares and rectangles, making it easier for students to practice solving for area of these shapes. This is just the start of teachers making the concept of area more applicable.

http://design.northwestern.edu/projects/profiles/tiny-house.html

 

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How have different cultures throughout time used this topic in their society?

The topic of finding area of squares and rectangles is used throughout many cultures. In the Native American culture along with todays, we see it in growing crops. A farmer must know how big their crop is so they can figure out how much food they will have at harvest. An instance used by many cultures is creating monuments in the shape of square pyramids. In order to build it the right way, you must know the area of the bottom base to build on top of that. A final use of it in our culture is in construction, when we decide how we want to build a building. The concept of area is something that many cultures use today because of how easy it is to calculate. This creates a great way for cultures that are less educated to become familiar with the same concepts as other cultures.

References

Geometry in Construction class finishes building first home. n.d. <http://tdn.com/news/local/geometry-in-construction-class-finishes-building-first-home/article_74143492-d7a9-11e2-995a-001a4bcf887a.html&gt;.
Tiny House Project. n.d. 6 10 2017. <http://design.northwestern.edu/projects/profiles/tiny-house.html&gt;.

 

Proof without words: Pythagoras for a clipped rectangle

Source: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=494951053971731&set=a.416585131808324.1073741827.416199381846899&type=1&theater

Engaging students: Finding the area of a square or rectangle

In my capstone class for future secondary math teachers, I ask my students to come up with ideas for engaging their students with different topics in the secondary mathematics curriculum. In other words, the point of the assignment was not to devise a full-blown lesson plan on this topic. Instead, I asked my students to think about three different ways of getting their students interested in the topic in the first place.

I plan to share some of the best of these ideas on this blog (after asking my students’ permission, of course).

This student submission again comes from my former student Juan Guerra. His topic, from Geometry: finding the area of a square or rectangle.

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E1.       How can technology (YouTube, Khan Academy [khanacademy.org], Vi Hart, Geometers Sketchpad, graphing calculators, etc.) be used to effectively engage students with this topic?

The website below contains an activity that relates both perimeter and area. In particular, the activity stimulates the student’s mind by making them think of a way to get the amount of fencing that they would need in order to build the stable for animals. After the character in the game learns about perimeter, he is made to think about the area that would be created from the stable. Then the activity mentions the different possibilities of getting the same perimeter but at the same time, the area of each different possibility is also analyzed. The activity makes students realize that even though all stables have the same perimeter, the area was different most of the time. The activity also has the students practice taking measurements and finding the perimeter and area of rectangles. This activity targets multiple objectives and skills because students learn about perimeter, area, and go over measuring the sides with a virtual ruler. This website contains more interactive games that target multiple skills, which will be helpful to the teachers when planning a lesson. Aside from having interactive games, the website also contains videos on tutorials for some basic computations or definitions of terms in math.

http://www.mathplayground.com/area_perimeter.html

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F3.   How did people’s conception of this topic change over time?

Ancient civilizations have known how to compute the area of basic figures including the square and the rectangle. These civilizations include the Egyptians, Babylonians, and Hindus. The Babylonians actually had a different formula for the area of a square or rectangle. The formula we know today is a*b, where a and b are the lengths of the figure. The Babylonian formula for multiplying two numbers, which was essentially the same as finding the area was [(a + b)2 – (ab)2]/4. Looking at the formula, it is clear that they had a different perception of what it was to find the product of two numbers and also the area of a square or rectangle. It turns out that the Babylonians were the only ones who used a different formula for the area of a rectangle or square, which means that they saw area differently than the other two civilizations. Another person that represented area was Euclid. In his book named Euclid’s Elements, he showed how multiplying two numbers would look geometrically, which was by taking a segment with length a and another segment with length b and putting them together so that they form a right angle at the ends and completing the rectangle by adding the other two missing sides. This method was used for visualizing the multiplication of numbers but it was also the representation of what area looked like geometrically although Euclid did not mention in his book that this was called area.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Egyptian_geometry

http://www-history.mcs.st-and.ac.uk/HistTopics/Babylonian_mathematics.html

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B1.   How can this topic be used in your students’ future courses in mathematics or science?

In the future, students will need to know the concept of area in general in order to solve other types of problems in courses like calculus. To illustrate a better example, suppose you have the equation y = x. What if you wanted a student to find the area of the triangle formed on the interval from 0 to 5? It would seem obvious that when the student graphs it and creates the triangle from that interval, he or she would use the formula for the area of a triangle once they are able to find the base and the height of the triangle. Another example where they would have to find the area of a rectangle would be when they have an equation like y = 5. Let’s say that you wanted to find the area of the rectangle formed from 0 to 4. The student would naturally use the formula that has been known to them for a long time and plug in the numbers. So what if we asked them to find the area of the function y = x^2 from 0 to 10? Would the student be able to use the formulas for area that he or she knows? This is where the concept of integration can be introduced to the student. The student might develop the curiosity of wanting to find out how it would be possible to find the area under a curve since the formulas for area that he or she has known all along do not apply. This is only one example where area can be seen in future courses but it seems like an activity like this would naturally lead into integration in a calculus class.

 

Engaging students: Solving for unknown parts of rectangles and triangles

In my capstone class for future secondary math teachers, I ask my students to come up with ideas for engaging their students with different topics in the secondary mathematics curriculum. In other words, the point of the assignment was not to devise a full-blown lesson plan on this topic. Instead, I asked my students to think about three different ways of getting their students interested in the topic in the first place.

I plan to share some of the best of these ideas on this blog (after asking my students’ permission, of course).

This student submission again comes from my student Brittney McCash. Her topic, from Pre-Algebra: solving for unknown parts of rectangles and triangles.

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A2. How could you as a teacher create an activity or project that involves your topic?

As a teacher, I want to do activities that the students would enjoy as much as possible. In doing so, I came up with a festive idea to incorporate my concept. Gingerbread houses. They are fun to build, while at the same time your thinking mathematically without realizing it. My job would be to bring these concepts forth. My engagement for the activity would probably be video on the shapes it takes to build a gingerbread house. Then I would pass out a blueprint of a gingerbread house that has missing angles or sides and have the students solve for them. This allows them to either set up proportions and see the similarities, or to solve for the sides using the characteristics of the shapes given. After the exploration of the blueprint, would come the construction part. I would have pre-cut pieces of graham crackers or other materials I would use, and have the students pick the pieces that match their blueprint; not every student will have the same. This is where the fun part would come. They would get to construct their gingerbread house, but if they made mistakes during their blueprint, their gingerbread house wouldn’t look right. Shapes wouldn’t fit, or maybe the gingerbread house wouldn’t stand because it didn’t have the right support. As these issues come up, I would be there to guide them in their discovery of “What went wrong.” This leads them to see how important having the corrects measurements truly are and how major they can effect the outcomes of things. Depending on the length of class time you have, this would probably be a two day activity.

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B1. How can this topic be used in your students’ future courses in mathematics or science?

To engage the students with this topic, I would pose a question asking the students, “What would happen if the Eiffel Tower wasn’t congruent on all four sides?” This question alone opens the floor for many different discussions to take place, but my main goal would be to establish what congruent is by definition, and how does that effect shapes and their placement. Through this question we would come to the conclusion that  the tower would either lean, not be sturdy, or maybe not even stand at all if the sides of the Eiffel Tower were not congruent. This shows how important measurements are when building buildings. My next step would be to go over how to solve for sides of triangles or squares if they are congruent. Once this is established, I can pose the question, “Now what if we were not given any angles or measurements? How could we tell if triangles are congruent?” This opens the room up for ideas how this would be done, and I would introduce the Theorems of Side-Angle-Side, Side-Side-Side, Angle-Side-Angle, and Angle-Angle-Side. Without going to extreme detail, I would express how important it is for them to grasp the concepts of solving for unknowns on triangles so that they are able to later, in Geometry, understand and utilize the idea for the theorems.

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E1. How can technology, be used to effectively engage students with this topic?

No matter where you go these days, technology is everywhere, so why not embrace it? There are two ways that technology can be useful in the classroom. One with websites or activities online that shed new light to a topic that is being taught, and also by helping students learn skills on technology that they will need later on. There are not many jobs out there, if any that do not use technology, so helping students get a grasp on it sooner rather than later may help them later on. My engagement for this aspect on my topic would be to do an online activity. Depending on the school, this will either be done in the classroom or a computer lab. I’ll have the students log on and open up this website: Cool Math . This website would be terrific in opening up this subject. I believe this because it doesn’t just jump right in to solving for unknowns. It gives you a quick overview of the relationships certain shapes have, then it gives you an odd geometric figure to find the perimeter of. This figure only has so many measurements given to them, and they have to solve for the rest using the relationships and definitions of the shapes involved. Another really interesting attribute I liked about this website, was that each shape had its own color. When it came time to solve for the big oddly shaped geometric figure, each shape involved was colored differently. This is great because I know how hard it is for some students to distinguish shapes from one another, and this might be a way for them to better visual the shape and its encountering partners to help tell what the relationship may be.

Engaging students: Finding the area of a square or rectangle

In my capstone class for future secondary math teachers, I ask my students to come up with ideas for engaging their students with different topics in the secondary mathematics curriculum. In other words, the point of the assignment was not to devise a full-blown lesson plan on this topic. Instead, I asked my students to think about three different ways of getting their students interested in the topic in the first place.

I plan to share some of the best of these ideas on this blog (after asking my students’ permission, of course).

This student submission comes from my former student Kayla (Koenig) Lambert. Her topic, from Geometry: finding the area of a square or rectangle.

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B) Curriculum: How can this topic be used in student’s future courses in math or science?

 Finding the area of a square or rectangle can be applied in many other subjects throughout a student’s school career. This topic is learned around 4th or 5th grade, and around this time students will just be using the formulas to find the areas. In middle school, they might be finding the areas by way of more difficult problems, like word problems. The real fun for this subject, in my opinion, doesn’t start until high school. In high school you can use the area of squares and rectangles to find the solutions to many problems. In high school geometry, the Pythagorean Theorem is taught. The area of squares is related to this depending on how the teacher presents this to the student. The Pythagorean Theorem states that “in any right triangle, the area of the square whose side is the hypotenuse is equal to the sum of the areas of the squares whose sides are the two legs of the right triangle” (Square-geometry).

In college, possibly high school calculus, students will learn to approximate the total area under a curve (or integral) using the Riemann Sum. To approximate the integral, you find the area of each rectangle, and all of the rectangles areas added together give you the approximated integral. The area of rectangles is also used in Statistics. When creating a histogram, you multiply the height (density) and width of the bars (rectangles).  Then adding the areas (relative frequencies) of all of the bars should be equal to one. Students will also need to use the area of squares and rectangles on college placement exams and standardized testing.

 

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C) Culture: How has this topic appeared in high culture (art, classical music, theatre, etc.)?

 In my opinion, anything and everything is a form of art, so the area of squares and rectangles can appear in an infinite amount of high culture. M.C. Escher has used squares and rectangles to create tessellations and “portrayed mathematical relationships among shapes, figures and space” (MC Escher). The area of a rectangle was used to Polykeitos the Elder who was a Greek sculptor. He used the area of a rectangle to create the perfect ratio for the human body. Painters also needed to figure out how to depict 3D scenes onto 2D canvas during the Renaissance (Mathematics and Art).

However, one of the more well-known applications of mathematics in art is the Golden Rectangle, which just so happens to involve the area of squares and rectangles. The Golden Rectangle is the area of the original rectangle to the area of the square, which is also the Golden Ratio. In other words, the Golden Rectangle is a rectangle wherein the ratio of its length to its width is the Golden Ratio (Golden Rectangle). Many ancient art and architecture have incorporated the Golden Rectangle into designs. The Golden Rectangle was used in the floor plans and design of the exterior of The Parthenon, which was a Greek temple dedicated to goddess Athena in 5th century BC (Mathematics and Art). Leonardo DaVinci also used the Golden Rectangle in his work. When painting the Mona Lisa, he used this to “draw attention to the face of the woman in the portrait” (Mathematics and Art). DaVinci also used the Golden Rectangle in the Last Supper using it to create a “perfect harmonic balance between placement of characters in the background” and also used it to arrange the characters around the table (Mathematics and Art).

 

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D) History: Who were some of the people who contributed to the development of this topic?

 Finding the area of squares and rectangles didn’t just come out of the blue; we can thank geometry and ancient mathematics for the development of this topic. One person in particular who contributed to the development of this topic was Euclid, or Euclid of Alexandria, who was a Greek mathematician and known as the “Father of Geometry” (Euclid). He was said to revolutionize geometry and his book The Elements is considered the most influential textbook of all time (History of Mathematics). The collection of his books, all thirteen of them, contain all traditional school geometry (Solomon).

However, Euler wasn’t the only one to contribute to this topic. Pythagoras and his students discovered most of what high school students learn in geometry today (History of Mathematics). In the classical period, Aryabhata wrote a treatise including the computation of areas. From the kingdom of Cao Wei, Liu Hui edited and commented on The Nine Chapters of Mathematics Art in 179 AD (History of Mathematics). There are so many people who contributed to this topic, and people are still contributing and developing to the area of squares and rectangles today!

 

Works Cited

“Euclid – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.” Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.  20 Feb. 2012. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euclid.

“Golden Rectangle.” Logicville : Puzzles and Brainteasers.  20 Feb. 2012. http://www.logicville.com/sel26.htm.

“M. C. Escher – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.” Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. 20 Feb. 2012. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M._C._Escher.

“Mathematics and art – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.” Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.  20 Feb. 2012. http://www.en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mathematics_and_art.

Solomon, Robert. The Little Book Of Mathematical Principals, Theories and Things. New York: Metro Books, 2008.

“Square (geometry) – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.” Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. 20 Feb. 2012. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Square_(geometry).

“History of mathematics – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.” Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. 20 Feb. 2012. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_mathematics.

 

Engaging students: Solving for unknown parts of triangles and rectangles

In my capstone class for future secondary math teachers, I ask my students to come up with ideas for engaging their students with different topics in the secondary mathematics curriculum. In other words, the point of the assignment was not to devise a full-blown lesson plan on this topic. Instead, I asked my students to think about three different ways of getting their students interested in the topic in the first place.

I plan to share some of the best of these ideas on this blog (after asking my students’ permission, of course).

This student submission comes from my former student Michelle McKay. Her topic, from Algebra I: solving for unknown parts of triangles and rectangles.

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A. How could you as a teacher create an activity or project that involves your topic?

There are several different ideas that immediately come to mind on how to center a lesson around solving for unknown parts of rectangles and triangles. I would like to focus on and describe one. For this particular lesson, the student will start by making a prediction of which side(s) of a shape (triangle or rectangle) has the greatest length. Then, with a partner, they will use rulers and a handout to record the dimensions of both shapes. On the handout, they will work to fill out the chart provided. Then, we will reconvene as a class and talk about the discoveries made. For rectangles, I would ask first about what we found to be consistent for every rectangle. Using what we know, how we could find or solve for the length of one side if we only had certain parts of information? Similarly for triangles, I would begin by asking how each side differed from one another. Did the general shapes of the triangles make a difference? What was special about the right triangles? After these questions, I would introduce Pythagorean’s Theorem and have them solve for the side of triangles without rulers, then follow up with using rulers to verify their information.

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D. What interesting things can you say about the people who contributed to the discovery and/or the development of this idea?

Pythagoras of Samos: During Pythagoras’ time, math was considered to be a mixture of both religious and scientific beliefs and was often associated with secret societies and only those of very high social standing. As Pythagoras was one of the more influential mathematicians of his time, most details of his life were kept secret until centuries after his death, leaving very little reliable information to be pieced together in form of a biography. It is generally accepted that he was born on the island of Samos, which is now incorporated into the country of Greece. Little is known about his childhood, but most agree that he was very well educated and was acquainted with geometry before he traveled to Egypt. He was known to be almost sacrosanct and divine to those alive during his time and even a few well after his death. He founded a religious, and simultaneously mathematical, movement called Pythagoreanism, which consisted of two schools of thought: the “learners” and the “listeners”.

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D. What are the contributions of various cultures to this topic?

Time Period

Civilization

Contribution

Earliest known references:

23rd Century B.C.

Babylonians

–          Had rules for generating Pythagorean triples.

–          Comprehended the relationship of a right triangle’s sides.

–          Discovered the relationship of \sqrt{2}.

 

500 – 200 B.C.

Chinese

–          Gives a statement and geometrical demonstration of the Pythagorean Theorem (possibly before Pythagoras’ time).

 

570 – 495 B.C.

Greek

–          Golden rectangles were very vaguely referenced by Plato.

–          Euclid wrote a clear definition of what a rectangle is.

–          Pythagoras discovered a relationship between the sides of right triangles.

 

Earliest known references:
800 – 600 B.C.

Indian

–          Pythagorean Theorem was utilized in forming the proper dimensions for religious altars.

It is very hard to for historians to pinpoint with exact certainty which civilization was the first to discover what we know now as the Pythagorean Theorem. Many of the civilizations listed above existed during the same time period, but were geographically located on opposite ends of the map. Also due to loss of information from translations, damaged or completely destroyed texts, these dates and the authenticity of certain contributions are still debated to this day.

 Sources

  1. http://www-history.mcs.st-and.ac.uk/Biographies/Pythagoras.html
  2. http://ualr.edu/lasmoller/pythag.html
  3. http://www-history.mcs.st-and.ac.uk/Biographies/Euclid.html
  4. http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/pythagoreanism/

Collaborative Mathematics: Challenge 07

My colleague Jason Ermer has posted his 7th challenge video, shown below. It’s both an experiment and an exercise in probability.

Video responses can be posted to his website, http://www.collaborativemathematics.org. In the words of his website, this is a unique forum for connecting a worldwide community of mathematical problem-solvers, and I think these unorthodox but simply stated problems are a fun way for engaging students with the mathematical curriculum.

Collaborative Mathematics: Challenge 05

My colleague Jason Ermer is back from summer hiatus and has posted his fifth challenge video, shown below.

Video responses can be posted to his website, http://www.collaborativemathematics.org. In the words of his website, this is a unique forum for connecting a worldwide community of mathematical problem-solvers, and I think these unorthodox but simply stated problems are a fun way for engaging students with the mathematical curriculum.